Saturday, February 24, 2007

Female Child Sexual Abuse: Some Evidence

US government statistics demonstrate that more mothers than fathers commit child abuse.

This article lists female teachers who have sexually abused their students. Most of the students were boys, many of them with special needs. The penalties given out were usually a hand-slap.

Female Sex Offenders: What Therapists, Law Enforcement and Child Protective Services Need to Know, Julia Hislop, Issues Press, 2001

The Female Sexual Abuser: Three Views , Davin, Hislop, Dunbar, Safer Society Pr, 1999

Female Sexual Abuse of Children, Michele Elliott, The Guilford Press, 1994

Female Sexual Predators: Veiled Epidemic. The few professionals who have worked in the area universally acknowledge massive underreporting by the boy and girl victims of female sexual predators and, even when reports of female sexual molestation emerge, they are met with disbelief by parents and police

Habits of Sin: An Expose of Nuns Who Sexually Abuse Children and Each Other Ashley Hill, Xlibris Corporation, 1995. The only book dealing with sexual abuse committed by nuns against children in their care

Many still don't see women as sex predators, The general public still does not let boys be victims like they do girls. And they don’t hold the offenders as accountable when the offender is a female.

Mother-Son Incest: The Unthinkable Broken Taboo Hani Miletski, Safer Society Pr, 1999

Record number sexually abused by women An increasing number of incest victims have stories to tell about female assailants, and experts say that women can more easily disguise such offenses as care.

Sexual assault of children by females Sexual abuse by women of children and teens is a subject most parents and caregivers are not familiar with. Female sexual predators go unreported because of a lack of awareness by the public.

Studies Investigate Female Sex Offenders Experts told the Channel 3 I-Team that an equal number of boys and girls fall victim to female sex offenders. Boys who are victims of female sex offenders, though, seem to receive less sympathy from friends, family and the public, who often look at having sex with an older woman as a conquest. A better understanding of female sex offenders and their victims remains elusive. Despite studies like those completed by Lewis, many others have encountered difficulty in finding offenders and victims willing to talk.

The Hidden Story of Sexual Abuse by Nuns
An excellent and detailed article. Click on the 'Words' section on the menu.

"It was acknowledged that the scale and nature of these attacks had been severely underestimated and there were examples of women using excessive force with implements such as chair legs and cutlery.
A surprising 86% of survivors of sexual abuse were not believed when they said the abuser was a woman.
Many myths were exposed, such as the one that women only sexually abused when coerced by men - they in fact played the lead part. Also the myth that women are incapable of cruelty - what was shown was beyond belief.
But despite the seriousness of these offences, women generally escaped custodial sentences".
Reference

Erin Pizzey provides anecdotal evidence from her own experience: "I was living in New Mexico, working on child protection cases. That’s when I discovered that there are just as many female paedophiles as male ones. Women pass unnoticed as usual." Reference

Sunday, February 18, 2007

Blackwell is the UK’s Duke

For those not familiar with the case, members of the Duke university lacrosse team decided to have a party and hire some strippers. One of the strippers, Crystal Gail Magnum, later claimed that she had been gang-raped and beaten by the students. There were around 46 students at the party and three of them were charged. More information here.

It is a case which has some disturbing echoes of the Warren Blackwell case.

  • There was no physical evidence that rape had taken place.
  • The accuser changed her story several times.
  • There was official corruption involved in the prosecution of the case, including the suppression of forensic evidence when it was found to undermine the accuser’s case and help the defence. The prosecutor, Mike Nifong, is now facing disciplinary action over his mishandling of the case.
  • Feminist activists adopted the case as a cause celebre, insisting that the accuser must be believed, no matter what.
  • The defendants find themselves hounded by the feminist lobby, and denied the presumption of innocence.

Cathy Young has some interesting things to say about the case in her recent article Duke: The Waterloo of "rape-crisis feminism"?

She documents the defamation being hurled at these (increasingly innocent-seeming) students by professional feminists of "the camp that Katie Roiphe once dubbed "rape-crisis feminists." These are the ideologues who see rape as the ultimate act of a male "war against women," and for whom, as Catharine MacKinnon put it in her 1987 book, Feminism Unmodified, "feminism is built on believing women's accounts of sexual use and abuse by men."

In order to avoid seeing their dogmatic beliefs challenged, rape-crisis feminists are obliged to attack the real victims in these cases - the falsely accused - while defending the real perpetrators - the false accusers. If they have to tear down the presumption of innocence enshrined in law for centuries in order to preserve their own credibility, then so be it.

In the Blackwell case, Ruth Hall and Lisa Longstaff of Women Against Rape harangued the BBC for having the audacity to allow Mr Blackwell airtime to defend himself:
"By affording him the status and power of authoring his own item, supporting his point of view on the Today programme, and making his "speaking out" a news item, the BBC has contributed to a miscarriage of justice." Reference

Wendy McElroy attempts to analyse the reasons behind this disturbing trend. "The attack is not based on what is true or false, on whether a rape occurred or not. NSVRC derives its money from the current paradigm of victimhood...They are fighting for their lives and livelihood."

Young comments: "I'm not sure it's money per se, so much as ideology. Either way, the victim advocates are strongly invested in perpetuating their dogma, at the expense not only of accused men but of the real victims."

I believe that both of these comments contain valuable insights. Young points out that feminists have built their careers on the presumption that their dogmatic beliefs are absolutely correct, and they simply cannot afford for this to be questioned; it means having to countenance the possibility that their life’s work has been wasted. McElroy is also right to follow the money. Groups such as Women Against Rape in the UK attract funding because others believe that they are responsible advocates caring for the needs of a vulnerable group. If they are shown to be corrupt, incompetent and politically motivated, they may see large chunks of their income start to dry up.

In order to protect themselves, they are obliged to attack (in the US) the Duke Lacrosse Three and (in the UK) Warren Blackwell, and in both cases, defend the false accuser, leaving her free to offend again.

In view of the analysis offered by McElroy and Young, the actions of these feminist advocates seem even more outrageous, not less. They are demanding the withdrawal of the presumption of innocence from sexual assault cases, flying in the face of centuries of legal practice. They are demanding an artificial lowering of the evidential criteria in such cases, in order to make securing a conviction easier. The costs of this, in both cultural and humanitarian terms, will be vast. And they demand this, just so that they can protect themselves, and their own funding. The arrogance and narcissism of that is astonishing.

These cases may well be, as Young suggests, ‘The Waterloo of Rape Crisis Feminism’. If she is right, then the outlook, in the US at least, seems bright; the Duke case has now reached such pantomime proportions that there seems to be no possibility of a conviction; indeed the prosecutor is now the one under investigation.

In the UK, meanwhile, Warren Blackwell hasn’t been so lucky. The innocent father served the whole of his sentence for sexual assault before having his conviction quashed. In order to give justice to him and his family, and others like them, we need to bring his accuser to account. While we are at it, we should also demand that genuine rape victims be given the quality of representation they deserve, rather than having their cause hijacked by this ragtag of unscrupulous heterophobic time-servers.